Projects > Quite

A New York Times article from 1910 describes Baltimore, Maryland adopting strict laws of segregation in housing after a black man moves into a predominantly white neighborhood. The borders which contain the portraits of the man and various lawyers morph with red lines into a bird, then the letter "R" in "Retreat", a poem about escape from the city to the countryside.

The poem was written by my great-grandmother Mabel. She lived in Roland Park, a neighborhood in Baltimore. Jim Crow laws, like the one described in the article on the left, helped facilitate the creation of Roland Park. It was initially built as a whites-only, lushly forested suburb, and very likely the scene of this poem. Her innocent love of a bucolic lifestyle was tied to the trauma of black people, yet most likely invisible to her at the time.

Exhibited at St. Charles Projects, May 2017.

Resources:
timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1?
hub.jhu.edu/magazine/2014/fall/roland-p?

Quite
Paper, frames, transparency, ink, invisible tape
2017
Quite
Paper, frames, transparency, ink, invisible tape
2017
Quite
Paper, frames, transparency, ink, invisible tape
2017
Quite
Paper, frames, transparency, ink, invisible tape
2017